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Story Archive

HM Queen Elizabeth and Gordon Smith at the reopening of Canada House, February 2015

Artist Profile: Gordon Smith

In the summer of 2014, at the age of 94, Smith toured Canada House with High Commissioner Campbell. They spoke of the plans for the building as a way of representing Canada in the 21st century with its focus on Canada and Canadians. Inspired by the new vision for Canada House, Smith decided to create a special painting for the High Commission → read the story


Trafalgar Square, circa 1890 (© The Francis Frith Collection)

Canada House: A History

Early in 1922, a Canadian tea merchant named Peter Larkin arrived in London. He was a natural marketer who had created Canada’s iconic Salada Tea brand and he set out to put a new face on Canada in the UK. From the time he was appointed High Commissioner to the United Kingdom on 10 February, by Prime Minister Mackenzie King, he was charged with consolidating all of Canada’s activities in Britain → read the story


Welcome to Canada House

Canada House has been the centre of Canada’s presence in the UK from the time it was first envisioned by High Commissioner Peter Larkin almost 100 years ago → read the story


Nunavut

Nunavut is Canada’s newest territory. It was established on 1 April 1999. The Inuit languages (Inuktitut and Inuinnaqtun), English and French are all official languages of the territory. Nunavut means ‘our land’ and its dramatic landscape is both strikingly beautiful and rich in natural resources → read the story


Emily Carr, Wood Interior, 1932-35
Emily Carr, Wood Interior, 1932-35

Artist Profile: Emily Carr

For 2015, Canada House presents Carr’s oil-on-canvas painting Wood Interior (1932-35). Graciously on loan from the Vancouver Art Gallery through the Emily Carr Trust, hopefully this is the first of many more opportunities to showcase Carr’s work in the years to come → read the story


Quebec Room
Quebec Room

The Meeting Rooms of Canada House

In the autumn of 1864, three British Crown colonies — New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and the Province of Canada — came together, first in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island and then in Quebec City, to forge a new country. They sought protection from US invasion and the creation of more stable commercial markets. They were driven by their historic and cultural relationship with the UK and their mutual interest and respect → read the story


Alberta

Named after Queen Victoria’s fourth daughter, Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the province of Alberta was the ninth to join Confederation — just hours after Saskatchewan → read the story