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Arthur Lismer, Docks on the Bay of Fundy, 1943
Arthur Lismer, Docks on the Bay of Fundy, 1943

Artist Profile: Arthur Lismer

The Government of Nova Scotia, on behalf of the people of Nova Scotia, has graciously presented the High Commission with a long term loan courtesy of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, of Lismer’s 1943 oil-on-canvas board Docks on the Bay of Fundy → read the story


Prince Edward Island

Prince Edward Island is named after Queen Victoria’s father, the Duke of Kent and Strathearn. As the host of the Charlottetown Conference of 1864, a major milestone on the way to the creation of Canada, it is known as the ‘Birthplace of Confederation’. Despite its early involvement in the discussions, however, Prince Edward Island did not join Canada initially. It eventually became the seventh province in 1873 → read the story


Pacific Room (detail)
Pacific Room (detail)

Beetle Mania

Pine beetle wood comes from lodgepole pine trees that have been infested by the mountain pine beetle, a longtime natural resident of British Columbia’s Interior forests → read the story


View of Trafalgar Square
View of Trafalgar Square

Canadian Roots in the Heart of London

From the 18th-century traders who met in Garraway’s coffee shop, to the poutine shops of Shoreditch, to the Governor of the Bank of England, and the CEO of the Royal Mail, Canadians have always been present in London → read the story


Northwest Territories

In Inuktitut the Northwest Territories are referred to as ‘Nunatsiaq’, which means ‘beautiful land’. Reaching for over 1.3 million square kilometres, it is home to the Great Bear Lake, the largest lake in Canada, and the Great Slave Lake, the deepest body of water in North America. The 1,738km-long Mackenzie River travels from deep in the heart of the continent to the Arctic Ocean, through the canyons of the Nahanni National Park Reserve (a UNESCO World Heritage Site) and the islands of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago → read the story


Architectural details
Architectural details

Architectural Heritage Shapes the City and the Square

Britain respects its architectural history as a prized asset, and nowhere more so than in London. The two buildings that form the western front of Trafalgar Square are the second oldest on the Square after St Martin-in-the-Fields → read the story


Nunavut

Nunavut is Canada’s newest territory. It was established on 1 April 1999. The Inuit languages (Inuktitut and Inuinnaqtun), English and French are all official languages of the territory. Nunavut means ‘our land’ and its dramatic landscape is both strikingly beautiful and rich in natural resources → read the story


Newfoundland and Labrador

Newfoundland and Labrador is where Canada sees its first sunrise. It is the youngest Canadian province, having entered the Canadian Confederation on 31 March 1949 → read the story