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Joyce Majiski carpet artwork
Joyce Majiski carpet artwork

Yukon

Yukon comes from the Gwich’in word Yu-kun-ah, meaning ‘great river’ — the Yukon River that flows through the territory. It’s the westernmost of Canada’s territories, bordering Alaska and the icy Beaufort Sea, and a region of extremes — extreme temperatures and extreme beauty. The lowest temperature ever officially recorded in Canada and in North America is -63°C (-81.4°F) on 3 February 1947 at Snag, Yukon → read the story


Natural Light, Fresh Air and Open Offices

Focusing on natural light and fresh air as well as varied and welcoming meeting spaces, Canada House's layout and furnishings are designed to support a high level of interaction and productivity → read the story


Nova Scotia

Surrounded by the Bay of Fundy, the Gulf of St Lawrence, the Gulf of Maine and the Atlantic, Nova Scotia is defined by the sea. You are never far from water, whether exploring the rugged coastal cliffs and wide sandy beaches, or inland, where vast stretches of pine forest are punctuated by lakes and spectacular waterfalls. The French were first to arrive from Europe. They settled alongside the indigenous Mi’kmaq and named the island peninsula Acadia → read the story


Pacific Room (detail)
Pacific Room (detail)

Beetle Mania

Pine beetle wood comes from lodgepole pine trees that have been infested by the mountain pine beetle, a longtime natural resident of British Columbia’s Interior forests → read the story


HM Queen Elizabeth and Gordon Smith at the reopening of Canada House, February 2015

Artist Profile: Gordon Smith

In the summer of 2014, at the age of 94, Smith toured Canada House with High Commissioner Campbell. They spoke of the plans for the building as a way of representing Canada in the 21st century with its focus on Canada and Canadians. Inspired by the new vision for Canada House, Smith decided to create a special painting for the High Commission → read the story


Miriam Rudolph, My Winnipeg IV, 2013
Miriam Rudolph, My Winnipeg IV, 2013

Manitoba

In the language of the Cree First Nation, Manitoba means ‘where the spirit lives’. The province started to take its modern form when Thomas Douglas, the fifth Earl of Selkirk, used his money and political connections to purchase land and settle poor Scottish families in British North America. First, in 1803 he helped settlers from Scotland find homes in Prince Edward Island. In 1804, he focused on Upper Canada → read the story


Quebec Room
Quebec Room

The Meeting Rooms of Canada House

In the autumn of 1864, three British Crown colonies — New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and the Province of Canada — came together, first in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island and then in Quebec City, to forge a new country. They sought protection from US invasion and the creation of more stable commercial markets. They were driven by their historic and cultural relationship with the UK and their mutual interest and respect → read the story