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Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan became a province in 1905. Its name is an adaptation of what the Cree called the great river that flows through the province, kisiskāciwani-sīpiy, which means ‘swift flowing river’. With its vast prairieland and seemingly limitless skies, the landscape creates a sense of boundless opportunity which has lured people from around the world to its borders. It has more hours of sunlight than any other province. Saskatchewan is Canada’s breadbasket → read the story


Ontario

Known as Upper Canada after the Constitution Act of 1791, Ontario is one of Canada’s four founding colonies. Canada’s most populous province, it is the ancestral home of the Ojibwa, Algonquin and Iroquois First Nations, among others. Its name is believed to mean ‘beautiful waters’ in the original Iroquoian → read the story


Welcome to Canada House

Canada House has been the centre of Canada’s presence in the UK from the time it was first envisioned by High Commissioner Peter Larkin almost 100 years ago → read the story


Even the Stone Needs Care and Attention

Stone seems so immutable, but in London it can take a beating. Soot, exhaust and just the wear and tear of the elements mean ongoing care and attention is essential → read the story


Northwest Territories

In Inuktitut the Northwest Territories are referred to as ‘Nunatsiaq’, which means ‘beautiful land’. Reaching for over 1.3 million square kilometres, it is home to the Great Bear Lake, the largest lake in Canada, and the Great Slave Lake, the deepest body of water in North America. The 1,738km-long Mackenzie River travels from deep in the heart of the continent to the Arctic Ocean, through the canyons of the Nahanni National Park Reserve (a UNESCO World Heritage Site) and the islands of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago → read the story


Architectural details
Architectural details

Architectural Heritage Shapes the City and the Square

Britain respects its architectural history as a prized asset, and nowhere more so than in London. The two buildings that form the western front of Trafalgar Square are the second oldest on the Square after St Martin-in-the-Fields → read the story


Arthur Lismer, Docks on the Bay of Fundy, 1943
Arthur Lismer, Docks on the Bay of Fundy, 1943

Artist Profile: Arthur Lismer

The Government of Nova Scotia, on behalf of the people of Nova Scotia, has graciously presented the High Commission with a long term loan courtesy of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, of Lismer’s 1943 oil-on-canvas board Docks on the Bay of Fundy → read the story