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Joyce Majiski carpet artwork
Joyce Majiski carpet artwork

Yukon

Yukon comes from the Gwich’in word Yu-kun-ah, meaning ‘great river’ — the Yukon River that flows through the territory. It’s the westernmost of Canada’s territories, bordering Alaska and the icy Beaufort Sea, and a region of extremes — extreme temperatures and extreme beauty. The lowest temperature ever officially recorded in Canada and in North America is -63°C (-81.4°F) on 3 February 1947 at Snag, Yukon → read the story


Northwest Territories

In Inuktitut the Northwest Territories are referred to as ‘Nunatsiaq’, which means ‘beautiful land’. Reaching for over 1.3 million square kilometres, it is home to the Great Bear Lake, the largest lake in Canada, and the Great Slave Lake, the deepest body of water in North America. The 1,738km-long Mackenzie River travels from deep in the heart of the continent to the Arctic Ocean, through the canyons of the Nahanni National Park Reserve (a UNESCO World Heritage Site) and the islands of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago → read the story


Architectural details
Architectural details

Architectural Heritage Shapes the City and the Square

Britain respects its architectural history as a prized asset, and nowhere more so than in London. The two buildings that form the western front of Trafalgar Square are the second oldest on the Square after St Martin-in-the-Fields → read the story


Natural Light, Fresh Air and Open Offices

Focusing on natural light and fresh air as well as varied and welcoming meeting spaces, Canada House's layout and furnishings are designed to support a high level of interaction and productivity → read the story


Canadian Women's Army Corps, World War II, celebrating VE Day
Canadian Women's Army Corps, World War II, celebrating VE Day

2–4 Cockspur Street: Canadian Military Headquarters (1939–1947)

On 1 July 1927, Thomas Bassett Macaulay, President of the Sun Life Assurance Company of Canada, laid the cornerstone of a new building at 2–4 Cockspur Street, immediately to the west of Canada House → read the story


Quebec Room
Quebec Room

The Meeting Rooms of Canada House

In the autumn of 1864, three British Crown colonies — New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and the Province of Canada — came together, first in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island and then in Quebec City, to forge a new country. They sought protection from US invasion and the creation of more stable commercial markets. They were driven by their historic and cultural relationship with the UK and their mutual interest and respect → read the story


The Queen Elizabeth Atrium

The Atrium off the Cockspur Street entrance to Canada House creates the opportunity to bring natural light into the heart of the building, to celebrate Canadian building products and design and to create a visual meeting space for High Commission staff → read the story


Newfoundland and Labrador

Newfoundland and Labrador is where Canada sees its first sunrise. It is the youngest Canadian province, having entered the Canadian Confederation on 31 March 1949 → read the story