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Story Archive

Even the Stone Needs Care and Attention

Stone seems so immutable, but in London it can take a beating. Soot, exhaust and just the wear and tear of the elements mean ongoing care and attention is essential → read the story


Alberta

Named after Queen Victoria’s fourth daughter, Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the province of Alberta was the ninth to join Confederation — just hours after Saskatchewan → read the story


Carpet in Sir John A Macdonald Room by Sean William Randall
Sean William Randall's carpet design adorns the Sir John A Macdonald Room

The Canadian Carpet Ride

Look down as you walk through Canada House and you will see magnificent Canadian oak, marble and granite — and 29 bespoke carpets commissioned to showcase Canadian craftsmanship and artistry → read the story


The Neighbourhood Called ‘Little Canada’

When the magnificent Trafalgar Square and the Nelson Monument were first designed there were no plans for fountains. As you look across the square today it is as if the fountains you see have been there for ever → read the story


Nova Scotia

Surrounded by the Bay of Fundy, the Gulf of St Lawrence, the Gulf of Maine and the Atlantic, Nova Scotia is defined by the sea. You are never far from water, whether exploring the rugged coastal cliffs and wide sandy beaches, or inland, where vast stretches of pine forest are punctuated by lakes and spectacular waterfalls. The French were first to arrive from Europe. They settled alongside the indigenous Mi’kmaq and named the island peninsula Acadia → read the story


Trafalgar Square, circa 1890 (© The Francis Frith Collection)

Canada House: A History

Early in 1922, a Canadian tea merchant named Peter Larkin arrived in London. He was a natural marketer who had created Canada’s iconic Salada Tea brand and he set out to put a new face on Canada in the UK. From the time he was appointed High Commissioner to the United Kingdom on 10 February, by Prime Minister Mackenzie King, he was charged with consolidating all of Canada’s activities in Britain → read the story


Newfoundland and Labrador

Newfoundland and Labrador is where Canada sees its first sunrise. It is the youngest Canadian province, having entered the Canadian Confederation on 31 March 1949 → read the story


Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan became a province in 1905. Its name is an adaptation of what the Cree called the great river that flows through the province, kisiskāciwani-sīpiy, which means ‘swift flowing river’. With its vast prairieland and seemingly limitless skies, the landscape creates a sense of boundless opportunity which has lured people from around the world to its borders. It has more hours of sunlight than any other province. Saskatchewan is Canada’s breadbasket → read the story